New Student Open House, "Passport to the Library", Friday 9/4

August 31, 2015 by Lisa · Comment 
Filed Under: events, general news

Welcome, new students! The staff of the Bentley Library are excited to help you have a great first year.

All new students are invited to the library’s First Week open house event, Passport to the Bentley Library, on Friday, September 4th. Check-in at the the arrivals desk any time between 11:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.  After receiving your passport and map you will embark on a self-guided tour.

As you explore, library staff will show you how to book study rooms, print to the library from anywhere on campus, borrow free museum passes, download books to your mobile devices, get help with your papers and assignments, and more.

Along the way you’ll be given some fun (and useful) giveaways. If you collect six or more stamps on your library passport, you will be entered to win a Google Nexus 7 and other great prizes!

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This is a special opportunity to meet the library staff and learn about all of the library’s services and resources. We look forward to seeing you at the library on Friday and throughout the year.

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter @BentleyLibrary, Instagram and Facebook for all the latest library news.

Try Our New Ask Us Service.

August 24, 2015 by Kimberly · Comment 
Filed Under: research help, services, web site

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One of our tasks this summer was to build a database of frequently asked questions and answers. The result is a new service that we are calling Ask Us.

Knowing that others have asked the same question is a comfort, but more than that, seeing questions you might not have intended to ask but wanted to know can help you to learn new things.

Here are a few examples:

Access is available in a number of ways:

If you have a question that is not answered, you can submit your question and your email address to get an answer. If the question is asked a few times, we’ll add it to the knowledge base. Of course, you can still visit our reference librarians in person at the library and we encourage you to do so, but try this service out. Give it a spin and see what questions others are asking and what the answers are.

Read at Your Own Risk!

August 18, 2015 by Amy · Comment 
Filed Under: displays

“Banning books gives us silence when we need speech. It closes our ears when we need to listen. It makes us blind when we need sight.” – Stephen Chbosky, author of The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Each year, libraries and bookstores around the country celebrate our freedom to read during Banned Books Week. Since the first Banned Books Week in 1982, the American Library Association reports that over 11,000 books have been challenged or banned in the United States.

A challenge is when a person or group tries to “remove or restrict” a book from a library or school. Banning is when that item is removed completely from a library or school.

J.K. Rowling, Judy Blume, and Stephen Chbosky are among the authors whose works have been banned or challenged in the United States. As recently as last year, there were over 300 challenges reported to the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom.

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The individuals or groups challenging these books have wanted them banned for a myriad of reasons. Anti-family (Saga by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples), “depictions of bullying” (The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie), and “controversial issues” (The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison) are just the tip of the iceberg. All three of these works were among the top ten most challenged titles of 2014 and are part of our “Read at Your Own Risk!” display.

Celebrate your freedom to read by checking out one of these books, on display in the library through October 5. During Banned Books Week, being held September 27 – October 3, stop by the Library Services desk to get a free Banned Books Week bookmark (while supplies last). And don’t forget search our Overdrive collection for downloadable challenged eBooks like The Hunger Games, Freakonomics, and Looking for Alaska.

Display co-produced by Amy Galante and Kristen Richards from Library Services. Kristen’s favorite controversial book is F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Amy is partial to Philip Pullman’s The Golden Compass. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram for more scandalous literary picks from the Bentley community.